Flagpole Parts List

As we move through the seasons, it is always a good idea to check on routine flagpole maintenance items. Routine maintenance can be inadvertently sidetracked without the helpful resource of a flagpole parts-list. Here are itemized, linked parts-lists for our most popular flagpoles.

External Halyard Type Flagpoles

External Halyard Type Flagpoles have the rope on the outside. For external halyard type poles, this list should provide you with a good reference for identifying any parts that might need maintenance or replacement.

Examples of external halyard flagpoles are the Ambassador flagpole and the Skyscape flagpole.

  • Ball/finial — If a ball finial is broken in inclement weather, the internal rod (or the broken ball itself) can snag and damage your flag. Replace at the first sign of damage.
  • Truck — stationary or spindle style. If you are having difficulty raising or lowering the rope, the pulley wheel may be broken. Forcing the rope up and down can cut the rope over time. To troubleshoot this, it will be necessary to have the flagpole serviced.
  • Halyard Rope — The rope should be changed periodically. When you check your snap hooks, check for signs of fraying anywhere on the rope, but especially where the snaps are connected and where the rope travels over the pulley at the top. Replace the rope any time you see visible signs of fraying.
  • Snap Hooks — Snap hooks make so much contact with the grommets and the rope that they eventually wear thin. We recommend checking snap hooks every three months at a minimum and replace as needed.
  • Snap Covers — Snap covers reduce the noise from snap hooks banging on your flagpole.

Internal Halyard Type Flagpoles

Internal Halyard Type Flagpoles have the rope or cable on the inside. For internal halyard type poles, this list should provide you with a good reference for identifying any parts that might need maintenance or replacement. Examples of internal halyard type flagpoles are the Embassy flagpole and the Empire flagpole.

Rope-Based Internal Halyard Flagpoles (Embassy)

  • Ball/finial — If a ball finial is broken in inclement weather, the internal rod (or the broken ball itself) can snag and damage your flag. Replace at the first sign of damage.
  • Concealed-halyard Cone-truck — If the truck stops rotating, it usually indicates a bearing issue. This seldom occurs, but if it does, the truck may need to be replaced.
  • Internal Halyard Rope Assembly (contact for details) — The rope should be changed periodically. When you check your snap hooks, check for signs of fraying anywhere on the rope, but especially where the snaps are connected and where it goes over the pulley at the top.
  • Snap Hooks — Snap hooks make so much contact with the grommets and the rope that they eventually wear thin. We recommend checking snap hooks every three months at a minimum and replace as needed.
  • Snap Covers — Snap covers reduce the noise from snap hooks banging on your flagpole.
  • Counter Weight — Counter weights have a neoprene cover on them that wears over time. Inside of this covering are the metal weights which then begin to wear against the pole. When this occurs, it is time to replace the weight.
  • Retainer Ring — A retainer ring looks like an oversized pearl necklace. Normal wear and tear will cause the balls to wear flat on one side, crack, and fall off. This leaves the metal cable to wear against the flagpole. Firstly, this abbrasion can damage flagpole finish. Secondly, the strands of the retainer ring cable can fray or break, leaving the flag to fly away from the pole, possibly prone to damage. Replace at the first sign of damage (debris on the ground, scratches in the finish or discoloration on the flagpole).
  • Quick Link — Quick links are used to connect various flagpole parts to others, such as a flagpole arrangement to a counterweight, etc... Quicklinks only need to be replaced if they are lost or broken due to highly inclement weather, extreme age, or vandalism.

Cable-Based Internal Halyard Flagpoles (Empire)

  • Concealed Halyard Ball Truck — If the truck stops rotating, it usually indicated a bearing issue. This seldom occurs, but if it does, the truck may need to be replaced.
  • Cable-based Internal Halyard Flag Arrangement — These arrangements are sized according to the flag being flown, so the arrangement must change if a flag of a different size is being substituted. Check the arrangement for signs of the cable fraying every time you change the flag. Replace at the first sign of damage.
  • Internal Halyard Cable Assembly (contact for details) — In this arrangement, a swivel connects an upper cable to a lower cable. If this swivel is removed or broken for any reason, the cables will fray or become wound into a "bird's nest" inside of the flagpole. Any signs of damage should be immediately serviced by a professional who specializes in caring for this kind of equipment, preferably an O.E.M. distributor.
  • Snap Hooks — Snap hooks make so much contact with the grommets and the rope that they eventually wear thin. We recommend checking snap hooks every three months at a minimum and replace as needed.
  • Snap Covers — Snap covers reduce the noise from snap hooks banging on your flagpole.
  • Counter Weight — Counter weights have a neoprene cover on them that wears over time. Inside of this covering are the metal weights which then begin to wear against the pole. When this occurs, it is time to replace the weight.
  • Retainer Ring — A retainer ring looks like an oversized pearl necklace. Normal wear and tear will cause the balls to wear flat on one side, crack, and fall off. This leaves the metal cable to wear against the flagpole. Firstly, this abbrasion can damage flagpole finish. Secondly, the strands of the retainer ring cable can fray or break, leaving the flag to fly away from the pole, possibly prone to damage. Replace at the first sign of damage (debris on the ground, scratches in the finish or discoloration on the flagpole).
  • Quick Link — Quick links are used to connect various flagpole parts to others, such as a flagpole arrangement to a counterweight, etc... Quicklinks only need to be replaced if they are lost or broken due to highly inclement weather, extreme age, or vandalism.
  • Winch (contact for details) — Winches are properly sized for the size of the flagpole. Consult your O.E.M. distributor to achieve the appropriate fit.
  • Winch Handle — A winch handle should be properly labelled and stored upon receipt. Because damage to a winch handle is rare, the most common reason for a winch handle to need replacing is that it has become lost.

Flagpole Anatomy

If you have more specific questions about the parts of your flagpole, the following four videos are dedicated to detailing the parts from the four specific outdoor flagpoles offered by LIBERTY FLAGS, The American Wave®. If you are looking to purchase new, please check out our flagpole category here.

Empire Flagpole — Internal Halyard Type

Embassy Flagpole — Internal Halyard Type

Skyscape Flagpole — External Halyard Type

Ambassador Flagpole — External Halyard Type

Photo Call!

Send us your pictures of American flags, flagpoles, ropes, or other accessories! We would be honored to feature your photography in our blog or on Facebook. Remember, photos of damaged flags and accessories are valuable, too.

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Please send all of your suggestions or questions to service@LibertyFlags.com. We want to hear from you!

Have a great day, from your friends at LIBERTY FLAGS, The American Wave®.


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