The Anniversary of D-Day is June 6

D-Day, The Eyes of the World

General Dwight D. Eisenhower addresses troops en route to the beaches of Normandy...

Codename: Operation Neptune

On Tuesday, June 6, 1944, the foundations for the Allied victory throughout Denmark, Norway, Luxembourg, Belgium, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, France, Italy, and Germany were laid. D-Day, codenamed Operation Neptune, and the invasion of Normandy began and German-occupied France was to be liberated, followed by the rest of Europe.

The Largest Seaborne Invasion in History

160,000 troops crossed the English Channel on D-Day. From within more than 5,000 landing and assault vehicles, Allied soldiers landed on the shores of Normandy and traversed beaches covered in landmines, wood stakes, tactical military obstacles, and barbed wire; all while under heavy gunfire from concrete gun-emplacements high upon dunes overlooking the water's edge.

Within six days, those troops had cleared the way for 715,000 more troops to reinforce the Allied objective and ultimately bring unity, freedom, and peace to war-torn Europe. Out of their heroism grew long-lasting international bonds of partnership, most of which are still in place today. As Eisenhower once said, "These people gave us a chance, and they bought time for us so that we can do better than we have before."

These People Gave Us a Chance

As an expression of gratitude to the soldiers who risked everything so that the world might know lasting peace, we are pleased to share these photographic memories which have been made available by the Wikipedia Commons.

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Meeting of the Supreme Headquarters Allied Expeditionary Force (SHAEF), 1 February 1944. Front row: Air Chief Marshal Arthur Tedder; General Dwight D. Eisenhower; General Bernard Montgomery. Back row: Lieutenant General Omar Bradley; Admiral Bertram Ramsay; Air Chief Marshal Trafford Leigh-Mallory; Lieutenant General Walter Bedell Smith..
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D-Day planning map, used at Southwick House near Portsmouth
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D-day assault routes into Normandy
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US assault troops in an LCVP landing craft approach Omaha Beach, 6 June 1944.
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Large landing craft convoy crosses the English Channel on 6 June 1944
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A LCVP (Landing Craft, Vehicle, Personnel) from the U.S. Coast Guard-manned USS Samuel Chase disembarks troops of Company E, 16th Infantry, 1st Infantry Division (the Big Red One) wading onto the Fox Green section of Omaha Beach (Calvados, Basse-Normandie, France) on the morning of June 6, 1944. American soldiers encountered the newly formed German 352nd Division when landing. During the initial landing two-thirds of Company E became casualties.
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British troops come ashore at Jig Green sector, Gold Beach
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Carrying their equipment, US assault troops move onto Utah Beach. Landing craft can be seen in the background.
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British troops take cover after landing on Sword Beach.
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Royal Marine Commandos attached to 3rd Infantry Division move inland from Sword Beach, 6 June 1944
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The Bayeux Commonwealth war cemetery
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The Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial, overlooking Omaha Beach
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You may also enjoy this 80-minute video from 1964 wherein General Dwight D. Eisenhower talks at length with Walter Cronkite about his thoughts, decisions, and experiences surrounding D-Day.

Photo call!

Send us your pictures of D-Day observations, American flags, flagpoles, ropes, or other accessories! We would be honored to feature your photography in our blog or on Facebook. Remember, photos of damaged flags and accessories are valuable, too.

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Have a great day, from your friends at LIBERTY FLAGS, The American Wave®.


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